Coptic Orphans Canada Office Director Speaks at Int’l Women’s Day Dinner

Winners 02a
Yamaska Valley Optimist Club International Women’s Day Dinner organizers, guests, and honorees. (R to L): Leonore Dudley – YVO President; Connie Barr – YVO honoree; Manal Bedwany – Keynote speaker; Shelley Judge – YVO honoree; Lindsay Tuer – YVO honoree; Ilze Epners – YVO chapter founder and event coordinator.

Manal Bedwany, the director of Coptic Orphans’ Canada office, was the guest speaker for the International Women’s Day Dinner of the Yamaska Valley Optimist Club (YVO) this Saturday, March 12. The event was held in the beautiful town of Knowlton, Quebec at the Lac Brome Community Centre.

“It was a great privilege to share the stage with the courageous women who were honoured by the YVO at their annual dinner,” said Manal. “I was grateful to have the opportunity to speak on the struggles that women, particularly girls and young women, face in the Middle East and beyond.”

“We were so honoured to have you as a guest speaker. Our young ladies certainly realized how fortunate they are…” llze Epners, founder the YVO chapter and coordinator of the event, said after the dinner.

Optimists Program

Funds raised at the event will support the club’s activities for local youth.

“I’m glad to have had a part in raising money for such an important cause,” Manal said. “As women, and leaders in our communities, we have a role to play in addressing human needs here in Canada, and wherever else in the world our talents and relationships give us the ability to make a difference.”

About Nermien Riad

Nermien Riad founded Coptic Orphans in 1988 after volunteering for an orphanage in Cairo. When she saw that most of the children had living widowed mothers who simply couldn’t afford to feed them, she gathered family and friends to sponsor children in Egypt. Today Coptic Orphans works through a network of 400+ church-based volunteers in Egypt, who visit fatherless families in their homes and make sure they get everything they need to unlock their full potential. That way, they don’t have to get married off as child brides, work as 10-year old family breadwinners, or go to live at an institutional orphanage.